BIOL 2420
Microbiology for Non-Science Majors

Western Texas College

  1. Basic Course Information
    1. Lecture—This course covers basic microbiology and immunology and is primarily directed at pre-nursing, pre-allied health, and non-science majors.  It provides an introduction to historical concepts of the nature of microorganisms, microbial diversity, the importance of microorganisms and acellular agents in the biosphere, and their roles in human and animal diseases. Major topics include bacterial structure as well as growth, physiology, genetics, and biochemistry of microorganisms.  Emphasis is on Medical microbiology, infectious diseases, and public health.
    2. Lab—the required laboratory activities will cover basics of culture and identifications of bacteria and microbial ecology.  This course is primarily directed at pre-nursing and other pre-allied health majors and covers basics of microbiology. Emphasis is on Medical microbiology, infectious diseases, and public health.
    3. Any required prerequisites:  None
    4. Required grade for enrolling in the next course in this sequence: None
  2. Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Lecture
      1. Describe distinctive characteristics and diverse growth requirements of prokaryotic organisms compared to eukaryotic organisms.
      2. Provide examples of the impact of microorganisms on agriculture, environment, ecosystem, energy, and human health, including biofilms.
      3. Distinguish between mechanisms of physical and chemical agents to control microbial populations.
      4. Explain the unique characteristics of bacterial metabolism and bacterial genetics.
      5. Describe evidence for the evolution of cells, organelles, and major metabolic pathways form early prokaryotes and how phylogenetic trees reflect evolutionary relationships.
      6. Compare characteristics and replication of acellular infectious agents (viruses and prions) with characteristics and reproduction of cellular infectious agents (prokaryotes and eukaryotes).
      7. Describe functions of host defenses and the immune system in combating infectious diseases and explain how immunizations protect against specific diseases.
      8. Explain transmission and virulence mechanisms of cellular and acellular infectious agents.
    2. Lab
      1. Use and comply with laboratory safety rules, procedures, and universal precautions.
      2. Demonstrate proficient use of a compound light microscope.
      3. Describe and prepare widely used stains and wet mounts, and discuss their significance in identification of microorganisms.
      4. Perform basic microbiology procedures using aseptic techniques fro transfer, isolation and observation of commonly encountered, clinically significant bacteria.
      5. Use different types of bacterial culture media to grow, isolate, and identify microorganisms.
      6. Perform basic bacterial identification procedures using biochemical tests.
      7. Estimate the number of microorganism in a sample using methods such as direct counts, viable plate counts, or spectrophotometric measurements.
      8. Demonstrate basic identification protocols based on microscopic morphology of some common fungi and parasites.
  3. Testing Requirements
    1. The Chapter Test and Final exam must be proctored by an approved testing organization.  (Ask you instructor for more details.)
    2. Students are NOT allowed to use their book or notes of any kind while taken their proctored tests and exam.
    3. All Chapter Tests and the comprehensive Lab and Lecture Final Exams are timed
  4. Course Requirements
    1. Online
      1. 10 multiple-choice chapter quizzes
      2. 4 current science article write-ups and associated online forum discussions
      3. 3 non-cumulative multiple-choice chapter exams
      4. 1 cumulative multiple-choice final exam
      5. 1 Required On-Campus Wet Lab
      6. 12 Lab Assignments
      7. 1 cumulative lab final exam
  5. Information on Books and Other Course Materials
    1. Required Book:  Microbiology with Diseases by Taxonomy Plus Mastering Microbiology 5th Edition by Bauman ISBN 9780133948851
    2. Lab requires Hands-on-Labs Kit# SP-3008-MB1
  6. Grading Breakdown:
    1. Online
      Articles……….………….………………………………………………...…....15%
      Quizzes………………….………………………………………………….…...10%
      Lab Assignments………………………………………………………………15%
      Chapter Tests……………..….………………………………………………...25%
      Lab Final Exam…………………………………………………………………10%
      Final Exam……………………………………………………………………….25%    
  7. Other Policies, Procedures and important dates. Please refer to the WTC Catalog for the following
    1. Campus Calendar
    2. Final exam schedule
    3. How to drop a class
    4. Withdrawal information
    5. Student Conduct/Academic Integrity
    6. Students with disabilities
  8. Course Content

Lecture

Laboratory Activities

Chapters Covered

Sections Covered

1 – A Brief History of Microbiology

Early microbiology, the golden era of microbiology,  modern microbiology

Laboratory Safety

2 – The Chemistry of Microbiology

Atoms, chemical bonds, chemical reactions, acids and bases, macromolecules

Microbiology Laboratory Preparation

3 – Cell Structure and Function

Processes of life, external structures of bacterial cells, bacterial cell walls, bacterial cytoplasmic membranes, cytoplasm of archaea, external structures of eukaryotic cells, eukaryotic cell walls and cytoplasmic membranes, cytoplasm of eukaryotes

Aseptic Technique and Culturing microbes

4 – Microscopy, Staining, and Classification

Units of measurement, microscopy, staining, classification and identification of microorganisms

Bacterial Enumerations: Dilutions and plate Counts

5 – Microbial Metabolism

Basic chemical reactions underlying metabolism, carbohydrate catabolism, other catabolic pathways, photosynthesis, other anabolic pathways, integration and regulation of Metabolic Functions

Antibiotic Sensitivity Kirby Bauer Diffusion Test

6 – Microbial Nutrition and Growth

Growth requirements, culturing microorganisms, growth of microbial populations

Biochemical Testing for Microbial Identification; MR-VP and Catalase

7 – Microbial genetics

The structure and replication of genomes, gene function, mutations of genes, genetic recombination and transfer

Microscopy for Microbiology – Use and Function

8 – Recombinant DNA Technology

Role of recombinant DNA technology, tools and techniques, applications of rDNA technology, ethics and safety

Bacterial Morphology and Staining Techniques

9 – Controlling Microbial Growth in the Environment

Basic principles of microbial growth, microbial selection models, physical methods of microbial control, chemical methods of microbial control

Biochemical Testing for Microbial Identification; Carbohydrate Fermentation

10 – Controlling Microbial Growth in the Body: Antimicrobial Drugs

History of antimicrobial drugs, mechanisms of antimicrobial action, clinical considerations in prescribing antimicrobial drugs

Microbial Identification Through Functional Media – Motility Testing

11 – Characterizing and Classifying Prokaryotes

General characteristics of prokaryotes, modern prokaryotic classification, survey of archaea, survey of bacteria

Environmental Influences on Microbial Growth – Salt Tolerance and pH Testing

12 – Characterizing and Classifying Eukaryotes

General characteristics of eukaryotes, protozoa, fungi, algae, water molds

Fomite Transmission

13 – Characterizing and Classifying Viruses, Viroids, and Prions

Characteristics and classification of viruses, viral replication, role of viruses in cancer, cultivating viruses, viroids and prions

Food Safety

14 – Infection, Infectious Diseases, and Epidemiology

Symbiotic relationships, reservoirs of infectious diseases, infection, nature of infectious disease, exit of pathogens, modes of transmission, classification and epidemiology of infectious diseases

 

15 – Innate Immunity

First lines of defense, second lines of defense

 

16 – Adaptive Immunity

Overview and elements of adaptive immunity, cell-mediated immune responses, antibody-mediated immune responses, types of acquired immunity

 

17 – Immunization and Immune Testing

Immunization, serological tests

 

18 – Immune Disorders

Hypersensitivities, autoimmune diseases, immunodeficiency diseases

 

19 – Pathogenic Gram-Positive Bacteria

Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Enterococcus, Bacillus, Clostridium, Listeria, Mycoplasmas, Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium, Propionibacterium, Nocardia, Actinomyces

 

20 – Pathogenic Gram-Negative Cocci and Bacilli

Neisseria, facultatively anaerobic bacilli,  aerobic bacilli, anaerobic bacilli

 

21 - Rickettsias, Chlamydias, Spirochetes, and Vibrios

Rickettsias, Chlamydias, Spirochetes, pathogenic gram-negative Vibrios

 

22 – Pathogenic Fungi

Medical mycology, pathogenic and opportunistic fungi, fungal intoxications and allergies

 

23 – Parasitic Protozoa, Helminths, and Arthropod Vectors

Parasitology, arthropod vectors, protozoan human parasites, helminthic human parasites

 

24 – Pathogenic DNA Viruses

Poxviridae, Herpesviridae, Papillomaviridae, Polyomaviridae, Adenoviridae, Hepadnaviridae, Parvoviridae

 

25 – Pathogenic RNA Viruses

ssRNA viruses, enveloped and naked RNA viruses, dsRNA viruses

 

26 – Applied and Environmental Microbiology

Food microbiology, industrial microbiology, environmental microbiology, biological warfare and bioterrorism

 

 

 

Last Modified: August 25, 2017